How I got rid of fake Twitter followers

Twitter is one of the biggest online social media platforms for networking and increases in the number of people every day who join this social media, has led to increase of fake followers. Before I even started, I did a quick search on Google and found this great guide on how to remove followers from Twitter. I had like 200 followers which I was able to cut down to only 15 using the tactics I described further down below.

after follower cleanup on Twitter

Fake followers in your account expose you to phishing or spam and may put you at risk for having your account deleted and this was the main reason I decided to to that.

Instructions for blocking follower on Twitter

how to block Twitter followersa. Log in to your Twitter account.
b. After your account opens, click on your follower tabs.
c. Find fake followers you want to block on your twitter account.
d. To the left, there is a gear icon click on it.
e. After it opens, select the 5th option from the top (block or report) and click on block.
f. Pick the reason you are blocking from the account.
g. At the bottom, you will find a notification – Congrats! You’ve blocked one fake follower.

And if hate to do it manually, I have to tell you; there are also tools for blocking fake followers on a larger scale. Some are paid while the others are totally free.

Custom tools for removing fake followers

One of them is Fakers app. This tool allows users to see how many empty or fake accounts are following you. You are supposed to authorise the app to access your Twitter account, and after a few minutes, you will be able to see your follower report.

Second is Fake follower app. This is a free app that checks a random sample of 100 of your followers against a list of criteria. The account will be defined as inactive if it has not tweeted in the past 90 days.

The third option is Twitter audit app. This app takes a sample of about 1500 followers from your account and then assign a score to each member on the ratio of followers to following the number of tweets and date of the last tweet from your account.

My 2 cents on Twitter cleanup

I used a custom script to do that, while I suggest to pick your favourite from one of these three tools. If I would have zero experience with programming I would probably go with the second option, which also have a cool feature to remove the blacklisted followers automatically. Shout out your favourite solution in the comments below!

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5 steps to creating an online course for geeks

In one year I created my online course that resulted in over $100,000 in income. In this article, I’m going to be teaching you five tips for creating your own profitable course.

Top tips on how to create an online course for geeks

Number one is: get to know your people. So my situation after working on one-on-one clients, I saw the same problems with my clients again and again and again. Besides that, everybody in my community had the same problem, and I was so frustrated, wanting to create a solution. It was driving me crazy. What I see a lot of, is people having an idea and then creating a course based on the idea. Most of the time, they are even not talking to their people, so my suggestion for you, is to get on the phone or Skype and ask people, which problem is going on in your industry and you’ll find that the same problem should emerge after you start talking to people in your business.

Number two is: to start really, really small. Your course should be tiny. What I mean by that, is you could create this giant course that’s like six modules which took you bazillion years to create all the content or you could start small, as I did. I had a workbook, and then I had two days of live training which was not pre-recorded.

It was just me, hopping on the live call and teaching people how to do stuff. For me, that was just wonderful, and it lasted only two days. It’s not a lot of stress, and I didn’t make assumptions about what the content would be. The content was created by everybody who jumped on the call.

progress over perfectionNumber three is: perfection is your enemy. I believe that people lose the most money on their courses because of perfections and mostly they never get it done.

Even if you start small, a course takes a lot of work, and if you let perfection come in and start editing and trying to get things perfect, it’s just going to hold you up and sometimes cause that you will never finish the course.

It’s never going to get done if you give in to perfection, so my suggestion is to be familiar that this is just a beta release and you will learn a lot from it.

Number four is: it takes a lot of time that the course is profitable. When I first started my beta round, I was expecting probably over a hundred people. I was thinking this is going to be an overnight success. I reached out personally to 60 people, and I messaged my list of just under a thousand. I had eleven people sign up for my course, so that was my first beta round. I could have given up there and said: “I didn’t get a lot of people.”

I did another three launches after that in the same year, and I noticed some interesting things. I found that more and more people would come as I would launch and I would get some testimonials. I would have videos, and I would tweak based on what people were saying. So just know it takes time, it’s not going to be an overnight success. Maybe, maybe if you’re really lucky but usually the money will come eventually as you grow and develop your course.

Number five is: you’re going to be freaking terrified, but just be okay with that right now. When I did my course, I didn’t sleep the night before because I was so scared. I thought that I was going to be a terrible teacher, that everyone’s going to hate my stuff, they’re going to hate my content, they’re going to ask for refunds, and personally, I’ve just found out something. When I have that intense fear, it means I’m doing good. It means that I’m moving in the right direction because it’s such new territory for me. I’m pushing myself to do something brand new, so it’s a good thing to have that fear.

What else I found is, that fear is going to be there. Every time I launch the course, there was always something I was terrified of doing, and nobody just starts creating courses like: “I’m gonna be the best at this first time.” When you are starting your business out, you are just wondering how to create a course, and that just happen in real life. Just be OK with your fear, and it’s going to happen smoothly.

Conclusion – grab the work and start creating course outline

I’m really excited for you because with this tips you’re going to kill it. I hope you like those tips for creating a profitable online course and if you want to learn more visit LearningRevolution website, to watch two hours long webinar, which goes in a specific detail of what exact tools you can use while you are creating the course.

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Linux and Flash – cut the crap already!

Linux and Flash - cut the crap already!Look, Adobe, can we please get with the times and start making a product that works on Linux? Please? It’s getting closer to 2010 and we’re still missing flying cars, meals in pills and a flash player that actually works most of the time. You see that? I’d even settle for most of the time right now. The sad truth is, Flash locks up on my current Ubuntu install, with the latest Flash release and it happens all the time.

Why on Earth should my modern browsers (Firefox, Opera) still freeze up on every third embedded video I try to play? Business websites are rendered ugly as hell because Flash just doesn’t know what to do with them. You do realize that by hindering a portion of today’s web browsing consumers you’re eventually affecting your own bottom line, right? Even a small portion who can’t do the things that web developers, web store owners and viral marketing execs expect them to do can be significant if it impacts delivery and sales.

For those who aren’t employed by Adobe. Yeah, I think that Flash sites are not the way to go, even with Google’s revelation that Flash can now be indexed. The truth of the matter is Flash is here and it’s probably here to stay so we need Adobe to please swallow whatever bitter pill they’re fumbling around with and just get a working version out to all of us in Linuxland so we can watch cats attack string on YouTube or whatever it is we’re wanting to do online. Okay? I know of lots of local, small sites like restaurants and small brick and mortar shops who have Flash front ends on their sites. And you know what? It stinks not being able to patronize them – for them and for me.

We need a working Flash. Let’s hope 10 does a much better job of it than 9. Until then, I’ll be taking my own petty mental revenge by referring to this monstrosity of a rich media crap fest as ‘flunk’ using my inside voice. No, that won’t fix anything but at least it will get that grimace on my face into a twisted smile as I kill and restart my browser yet again.

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Things you should never EVER type in Linux. Ever!

Things you should never EVER type in Linux. Ever! I feel that I need to put a warning at the top of this post because try as I might in the subject to be clear about what I mean, I know that someone will go and type/execute one of these things into their production server at work and then be horribly distraught and/or cause some sort of power grid catastrophe across the Pacific Northwest or something.

If you’re a Linux guru or or experienced enough to know what all of these things are then you probably don’t need this article and we can go our merry ways. If not, then DO NOT, DON’T, NEVER EVER EVER EVER run these commands in a terminal session. If you do you will render your system anything from useless without a forced reboot to devoid of any useful purpose ever.

Why write this article on ArsGeek then? Because you should be forewarned as a Linux user that there are people out there who consider it good fun to bait others into running destructive and harmful commands on their machines. Particularly those new to Linux. So use this list as a caution as to what not to do. And note that it’s not an exhaustive list, simply a quick reference against stuff you really don’t want to do. Bottom line is, research what you’re about to execute before you push the enter key and know what you’re doing to your system, yourself and your job prospects.

Let’s start with commands that delete things that probably shouldn’t be deleted, shall we?

The basic way to delete a file in Linux is with the rm command. rm foo will take foo, wring its skinny neck and throw it down the drain. Gone. See you later.

Now there are lots of variants on these commands. Let’s look at a few. Again, look but do not execute!
rm -rf ./ - Delete the files in a current directory (all of them)
rm -rf / - Delete the partition. (AHHH!)
rm -rf . - Delete the whole directory.
rm -rf * - Delete all visible files in a directory

Running all of these commands have certain real world utility. They’re also a great way to fubar your system if run in the wrong place. Remember ‘rm’ means remove. -r means recursive and -f means don’t bother asking me if you want me to really delete your /usr/bin directory – or any other for that matter.

Mean folks have gotten slightly more creative and regular Linux users have made this mistake more than once.

rm -rf .* - Delete all hidden (files that start with a ‘.’) files.

Now, how about the good old fork bomb! Sounds ominous eh? What a fork bomb does is eat up all of your available system processes, essentially bringing your system to it’s knees. A fork is when a program spawns another program – often a version of itself. A fork bomb is when this happens endlessly and nearly exponentially until there are no resources left on your system. Most often the only way to get out of this is to hard reboot (i.e. hold down the old power button) which can cause file system problems. Here’s a few examples of fork bombs to watch out for:
:(){ :|:& };: - The cutest one. Like a vorpal bunny.
#!/usr/bin/perl - for Perl meanies.
fork while 1

or also in perl:
fork while fork
#include <unistd.h>
int main(int argc, char* args[])
{
while(1)
fork();
return 0;
}

That last one is in C. As you can see there are a bunch of ways to do this – the above examples are only that, examples. Just be careful of code you don’t know with the word ‘fork’ in it, or of typing lots of emoticons into your shell.

Even windows users can be subject to fork bombs in the form of malicious batch code. Here are two examples:
:s
START %0
GOTO :s
%0|%0

The next kind of code bomb is a tar bomb. Tar is a nifty program for compressing and uncompressing stuff so you don’t have to lug around hefty loads of data. Tared files can be crafted however to ‘explode’ into an existing directory, rather than into a new directory.

An example: Say you’re in your home directory and you have file called foo.tar you want to untar. So you do so and it should untar into a directory called /foo sitting in your home directory. Through malice or bad practice though, it could just untar all of it’s files into your /home directory. This is bad if there are say. . . 487,038 files in the tarbomb. Now you’ve got all the junk to sort through in your home directory. Ouch!

The same can be said for any uncompiled code. If you don’t know where it’s coming from think twice before compiling it. It’s very easy for someone to hide a chunk of malicious code in the thousands of lines of codeit takes to make a program.

Bottom line is – be cautious, don’t run things if you don’t know where they came from and always, always check what a command does if you’re not familiar with it. Not only will this make you more productive and more powerful user but it will help you protect yourself as well. Remember this isn’t an exhaustive list, there are plenty of other tricks out there as well. Be safe.

Edit: Thanks to the commenters for pointing out some errors – I’ve since corrected them!

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Designing the Singularity: Intel receives the Overreaching Statement Award

Designing the Singularity: Intel receives the Overreaching Statement Award. “We’re making steady progress toward Ray Kurtzweil’s singularity,” says Justin Rattner, CTO of Intel.

THE Singularity, that’s what he’s talking about. You know, the point where machine intelligence jogs past human intelligence and brings us to a new era where combined computer cognition is the equivalent of a minor deity. Not only that, but it’s Kurzweil, without the T. I don’t know if that’s Intel’s fault or Cnet’s on the transcription.

What is the Singularity really? It’s where machine intelligence surpasses human intelligence – even by just a tiny bit. At that point, the machines, which are now more knowing than we are, can recursively improve on themselves in a never ending and rapidly accelerating cycle of getting better and better.

Kurzweil tones it down a bit and simply says it’s going to be a time where machines can manifest their own rapidly advancing technology. The implications of a meteoric rise in technology, self replicating smarter than human intelligences and you know, superbeings. . . it’s all still there though. Perhaps in Intel’s mind, the Singularity involves computers designing processors for their next of kin to the point where we have the 1nm Intel processors featuring 10,000 cores.

Is this something we really want to work towards? Is it inevitable? And will these machines become self aware? No one really knows but it’s certainly an interesting concept to think on.

For their part, I’ve awarded the first ever ArsGeek Overreaching Statement Award to Intel. Congratulations Intel! Stating that they are actively working on the Singularity goes a bit beyond miniaturizing processors and coming up with interesting ways to optimize code for multiple cores. It’s a bit like casually stating that your experiments on family dog have yeilded a doberman with the intelligence of your or I and the ability to speak several languages.

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